IS5416 Analysis and Design of Electronic Business Systems

Part I

Course Duration:
One Semester (13 Weeks)
Credit Units:
Three
Level:
P5
Medium of Instruction:
English
Prerequisites:
Nil
Precursors:
Nil
Equivalent Courses:
Nil
Exclusive Courses:
Nil


Part II  


Course Aims:

provide students with knowledge and experience relevant to analysis and design of digital products in general and Electronic Business (e-Business) Application Systems in particular.  The course will emphasise the special requirements of digital products and the appropriate analysis and design methods.  Emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms required for evaluating requirements of e-business systems and the formulation of solutions and options for e-business application acquisition, development and implementation.

Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

No.

CILOs

Weighting
(if applicable)

1.

Describe systems analysis and design for e-Business system development and different approaches to e-Business system requirement determination, system analysis, design, creation, application and deployment.

1

2.

Apply knowledge of systems analysis and design methodologies, particularly the object-oriented approach using Unified Modelling Language, to devise and model e-Business system effectively with appropriate modelling techniques.

3

3.

Analyse different options to recommend the best suitable e-Business systems solution to a business problem.

1

4.

Design and evaluate alternative design strategies for e-Business system construction.

2

5.

Demonstrate team building and communicate with team members effectively with different means including oral, written and electronic formats.

2

(3: Relatively most focused CILOs; 2: moderately focused CILOs; 1: less focused CILOs)

Teaching and learning Activities (TLAs)

(Indicative of likely activities and tasks designed to facilitate students’ achievement of the CILOs. Final details will be provided to students in their first week of attendance in this course)


TLA1: Lecture

Concepts of systems analysis and associated modelling techniques are explained using activities designed to enable students to differentiate between structured and object-oriented methods, to apply different modelling techniques, to evaluate different business process change options, and to select and evaluate appropriate requirements determination and structuring.  Concepts of designing user interface, application construction and user interaction are explained and illustrated using examples to enable students understanding on constructing e-Business system possessing aesthetic and practical characteristics.

TLA2: Laboratory

During laboratory sessions, the following activities are used to reinforce and practice of various modelling and design techniques learnt in lectures:

  • Exercises: Hands-on activities using a CASE tool (e.g., Microsoft Visio) as part of systems modelling exercises such as requirement gathering using interviews, questionnaires, Use Case models, functional models, structural models and behavioural models.  Hands-on activities using a design tool (e.g. Frontpage, VB.net) for constructing e-Business system.
  • Discussion: Discussion on implications of various concepts learnt in lectures, and how they can be applied to a typical e-Business system project.  Discussion, critique and selection among different approaches of requirement determination, and structuring, system acquisition and development, system architectures, as well as suggestion for improvement on above issues.
  • Presentations: Members of project team will make presentation of their project work, and other teams and the instructor will comment, question and offer suggestions for improvements.

TLA3: Project
Students would have to complete a group project requiring them to perform systems analysis and design activities aimed at capturing requirements, diagramming models, proposing acquisition/development alternatives, constructing aesthetic and practical application prototype of a digital product or an e-Business system in business sector.  The group project work will be submitted at different phases for review and comments by the instructor/tutors.

CILO No

TLA1: Lecture

TLA2: Laboratory

TLA3: Project

Hours/week
(if applicable)

CILO 1

1

1

 

---

CILO 2

2

2

2

---

CILO 3

1

1

1

--

CILO 4

1

 

1

--

CILO 5

1

1

1

---

(1: Minor focus on the CILO; 2: Main focus on the CILO)

Assessment Tasks/Activities

(Indicative of likely activities and tasks designed to assess how well the students achieve the CILOs. Final details will be provided to students in their first week of attendance in this course)


AT1: Continuous Assessment (15%)

Participation in class and lab sessions in activities such as:

  • application of systems analysis techniques, including requirement and information gathering and structuring techniques
  • modelling exercises, presentation and discussion of proposed solutions to various scenarios of e-Business environment
  • critical analysis and suggestions to requirements models presented
  • design works of system prototypes, user interface and user interactions

AT2: Project (30%)
Each team of 3 or 4 students will analyse, collect and structure requirements of a proposed e-Business system, and model those requirements using appropriate techniques, particularly using object-oriented approaches.  The project work should be completed in five parts and submitted in two phases:


Part 1 – e-Business system description and requirements determination and structuring.

Part 2 – project assumption, planning, management and justification of requirement for the e-Business system.

Part 3 – Finalize Part 1 and 2; Analysis using Use case models, with Use case descriptions, as well as activity diagrams.  Submission of Phase 1 works which include all deliverables in Part 1, 2, 3 and the presentation slides.
Part 4 – Develop corresponding Class diagrams (with all attributes, behaviours/operations and relationships); differentiate the object-oriented approach with traditional approach such as Data Flow Diagram (DFD).  Design the application interface and interaction prototype for the e-Business system.
Part 5 – Propose a system architecture, an acquisition and/or development of the e-Business system.  Submission of Phase 2 works which include all deliverables in Part 4, 5 and the presentation slides.


AT3: Project Presentation (5%)

Members of each team present their project work in about 30 minutes twice throughout the semester and other teams will participate in discussion, commenting, questioning and offer suggestions for improvements.


AT4: Final Examination (50%)

This open-book examination will assess both the conceptual understanding and the modelling skills using one or more small e-business scenario.

CILO No

AT1: Continuous Assessment (15%)

AT2: Project (30%)

AT3: Project Presentation (5%)

AT4: Final Examination (50%)

Remarks

CILO 1

1

1

 

2

1: Minor focus on the ILO;

 2: Main focus on the ILO)

CILO 2

2

2

 

2

CILO 3

1

1

 

1

CILO 4

 

1

 

1

CILO 5

1

1

2

 

Grading of Student Achievement:
(see the rubrics attached)


Part III

Keyword Syllabus:

Systems development life cycle and methods; Object-oriented system analysis and design; Unified modelling language (UML) and Unified process; Requirements determination; Requirement structuring; Conceptual Data Modelling; Analysis Classes; Functional modelling; Structural modelling; Behavioural modelling; Design Strategy; Design Elements; Human Interface and Prototyping.
 

IS5416: Analysis and Design of Electronic Business Systems – Assessment Rubrics

(H: High weighting; M: Medium weighting; L: Low weighting)

Continuous Assessment:

Criteria

Weight

A

B

C

D

[CILOs 1, 3] Laboratory/Tutorial exercise submission

M

-    Effectively determine and structure the requirements of a business problem

-    Effectively distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select suitable ones

-    Determine and structure most of the requirements of a business problem

-    Distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select reasonable ones

-    Determine and structure some necessary requirements of a business problem

-    Distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select some suitable ones

-    Fail to determine and structure the requirements of a business problem

-    Fails to distinguish between available options in modelling requirements

[CILOs 1, 2, 4] Laboratory/Tutorial exercise submission

H

-    Demonstrate good understanding  of OO and UML concepts and methodology

-    Show clearly the relationships between the solutions to the concepts

-    Strong evidence of effective use of CASE tool in developing UML artefacts

-    Demonstrate fair understanding  of OO and UML concepts and methodology

-    Show the relationships between the solutions to the concepts

-    Good evidence of effective use of CASE tool in developing UML artefacts

-    Demonstrate some understanding  of OO and UML concepts and methodology

-    Unable to related solutions to some concepts

-    Moderate evidence of effective use of CASE tool in developing UML artefacts

-    Demonstrate little understanding  of OO and UML concepts and methodology

-    Unable to related solutions to most concepts

-    Little evidence of effective use of CASE tool in developing UML artefacts

[CILO 5]

Participation in tutorial activities

M

-    Exhibit excellent team effort in group activities

-    Enthusiastic, contribute to discussion actively by asking and responding to questions frequently and proactively

-  Exhibit good team effort in group activities

-    Active, contribute to discussion by asking and answering questions occasionally

-  Exhibit moderate team effort in group activities

-    Active when prompted, contribute to discussion by responding to questions when asked

-    Exhibit no team effort in group activities

-    Occasionally active when urged, and respond to questions when repeatedly asked

Project:

Project section

Weight

A

B

C

D

[CILO 1] System description (business environment, purpose, requirement determination)

H

-    evidence of good understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    material is based on information from of multiple sources

-    well-structured and grammatically correct description 

-    excellent variety of features, including some innovative features, covering multiple stakeholders (users)

-    evidence of fair understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    material is based on information from of two or three different types of sources

-    well-structured description  with some grammatical errors

-    good variety of features, including some innovative features, covering most of the stakeholders (users)

-    evidence of reasonable understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    material is based on information from of two or three similar type of sources

-    description has good structure but many grammatical errors

-    good variety of features, but not innovative, covering most of the stakeholders (users)

-    poor understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    mostly based on information from of a single source

-    poorly structured description with many grammatical mistakes

-    features primarily focused on data collection and reporting; covers only one or two types of stakeholders (users)

[CILO 2] Use case models and process description (use case diagram and descriptions, activity diagrams)

M

-    all use cases are appropriately named and relationships are properly selected and shown on use case diagrams

-    use case descriptions clearly show the extent of support provided by the system to the user through well described & precise step descriptions and extensions

-    processes that span across different users/systems are well-depicted in activity diagrams using a good mix of constructs

-    most use cases are appropriately named and relationships are properly selected and shown on use case diagrams

-    use case descriptions show the extent of support provided by the system to the user through precise step descriptions and extensions

-    processes that span across two or three users/systems are well-depicted in activity diagrams

-    many use cases are poorly named and many relationships are either improperly selected or not shown on use case diagrams

-    use case descriptions show some support by the system but filled with many manual steps; step descriptions are somewhat vague and some step extensions are not correct

-    activity diagrams depict simple processes that are performed by one or two users/systems

-    most use cases are poorly named and many relationships are either improperly selected or not shown on use case diagrams

-    use case descriptions show very little support by the system and filled with manual steps; step descriptions are vague and step extensions are not correct

-    activity diagrams depict simple or very simple processes that are performed by one or two users/systems

Project (contd)

 Project section

Weight

A

B

C

D

[CILO 2]  Structural model (class diagram)

M

-    nearly all relevant classes, attributes, operations and relationships are captured using appropriate names following the naming and layout conventions

-    the entire class diagram represents & matches with the system requirements described in parts 1 and 2 of the report

-    many relevant classes, attributes, operations and relationships are captured using appropriate names following the naming and layout conventions

-    the entire class diagram represents and matches with most of the system requirements described in parts 1 and 2 of the report

-    some important classes, attributes, operations and relationships are missing;

-    naming and layout conventions are not followed at some places

-    some differences observed in the class diagram compared to the system requirements described in parts 1 and 2 of the report

-    many important classes, attributes, operations and relationships are missing;

-    naming and layout conventions are not followed uniformly

-    significant differences observed in the class diagram compared to the system requirements described in parts 1 and 2 of the report

[CILO  2] Behavioral models (sequence diagrams and comparison of traditional approach, i.e. DFD)

M

-    depict well-structured message flows targeted to most suitable objects/classes with proper parameters

-    exhibit excellent usage of different types of control structures and message flows

-    the sequence diagrams closely correspond to related use case descriptions

-    depict well-structured DFD with accurate data flows among context diagram and different levels of DFD

-    depict fairly well-structured message flows targeted to suitable objects/classes with proper parameters

-    exhibit proper usage of different types of control structures and message flows

-    the sequence diagrams mostly correspond to related use case descriptions

-    depict fairly well-structured DFD with most data flows correctly shown among context diagram and different levels of DFD

-    depict poorly-structured message flows sometimes  targeted to wrong objects/classes

-    exhibit usage of simple types of control structures and message flows with proper message names and parameters

-    some sequence diagrams do not match with/correspond to related use case descriptions

-    some DFD diagrams among different levels, including the context diagram, are found inconsistency and incorrect in data flows

-    depict poorly-structured message flows often targeted to wrong objects/classes

-    exhibit usage of simple types of control structures and message flows

-    message names and parameters are not appropriately selected

-    most sequence diagrams do not match with/correspond to related use case descriptions

-    Fail to have a consistent and accurate data flows among the context diagram and different levels of DFD

[CILOs 3, 4]

Recommend a suitable e-Business system solution

H

-    Propose several feasible and effective design strategies to the business problem and recommend the most suitable solution.

-    Propose several design strategies to the business problem and recommend a reasonable solution.

-    Propose some simple design strategies to the business problem and recommend an acceptable solution.

-    Fail to propose any design strategy to the business problem and recommend an unacceptable solution

[CILOs 5] Intermediate and finalized version of the project

H

-    Tightly integrated across different sections; contains improvements based on comments provided/ understanding; neatly presented (format, layout, etc.)

-    evidence of excellent team effort

-    Tightly integrated across different sections; contains some improvements based on comments provided /understanding; neatly presented (format, layout, etc.)

-    evidence of good team effort

-    Some integration is evident across different sections; contains some improvements based on comments provided /understanding; poorly laid out diagrams and text

-    evidence of moderate team effort

-    No integration is evident across different sections; contains very little improvements based on comments provided /understanding; poorly laid out diagrams and text

-    no evidence of team effort

Project presentation:

Criteria

Weight

A

B

C

D

[CILOs 5] Overall organization of presentation

L

-    Well-structured and presented in a logical sequence, used time wisely

-    The group collectively covered all the major topics/issues.

-    Mostly structured, precise but parts may be unconnected to the rest of the presentation

-    The group collectively covered most of the topics/issues.

-    Somewhat structured but too much time spent on unimportant material. Disjointed sequence

-    A few of the individuals covered many of the topics/issues

-    Unstructured, strays from the subject. Much of the presentation out of logical order. Goes over time limit

-    The group presented the topics in such a manner that the audience could not follow/understand

[CILOs 5] Response to questions and comments

L

-    The group collectively demonstrates full knowledge by answering all questions with explanation and elaboration

-    The group is at ease with expected answers to all questions, but fails to elaborate.

-    The group is able to answer only rudimentary questions

-    The group cannot answer questions about subject

[CILO 5] Individual – comprehensibility, eye contact and elocution

L

-    Clear and easily understood

-    Maintains eye contact with audience, seldom returns to notes

-    Uses a clear voice and modulation so that all audience can hear presentation

-    ­ Mostly clear but some confusion in the presentation

-    Maintains eye contact most of the time, but frequently returns to notes­

-    Voice is clear; most audience can hear presentation

-    Somewhat clear but leaves the listener a little lost.

-    Occasionally uses eye contact, but still reads most of report

-    Voice is low; audience have difficulty hearing presentation

-    Unclear and confusing. Not understood.

-    Reads all of report with no eye contact

-    Mumbles and speaks too quietly for students in the back of class to hear

Final Examination:

The list below is an indication of the importance of different CILOs to be assessed during the final examination.  This examination will assess both the conceptual understanding and the modelling skills using one or more small e-business scenarios.

(H: High weighting; M: Medium weighting; L: Low weighting)

Criteria

Weight

A

B

C

D

[CILO 1]

Processes for e-Business system (eBS) development; Establishment of an application portfolio for development

L

-    Effectively determine and structure the requirements of a business problem

-    Well-establish a complete and detailed application portfolio for development

-    Determine and structure most of the requirements of a business problem

-    Establish a nearly complete application portfolio for development

-    Determine and structure some necessary requirements of a business problem

-    Establish a good and acceptable application portfolio for development

-    Fail to determine and structure the requirements of a business problem

-    Fail to establish an application portfolio for development

[CILO 1]

System analysis, design, creation, application and deployment.

M

-    Evidence of good understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    Well-structured and grammatically correct description 

-    Excellent variety of features, including some innovative features, covering multiple stakeholders (users)

-    Evidence of fair understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    Well-structured description  with some grammatical errors

-    Good variety of features, including some innovative features, covering most of the stakeholders (users)

-    Evidence of reasonable understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    Description has good structure but many grammatical errors

-    Good variety of features, but not innovative, covering most of the stakeholders (users)

-    Poor understanding of the business system operations & IS requirements

-    Poorly structured description with many grammatical mistakes

-    Features primarily focused on data collection and reporting; covers only one or two types of stakeholders (users)

[CILO 2] Application of knowledge of systems analysis and design methodologies

H

-    Name all use cases appropriately and show proper relationships on use case diagrams

-    Tabulate detailed use case descriptions clearly showing the extent of support provided by the system to the user

-    Well-understanding and well-illustration of nearly all relevant classes, attributes, operations and relationships in an entire class diagram, which matches with the system requirements

-    depict well-structured message flows targeted to most suitable objects/classes with proper parameters

-    depict well-structured DFD with accurate data flows among context diagram and different levels of DFD

-    Name most use cases appropriately and shows most relationships on use case diagrams

-    Tabulate nearly completed use case descriptions showing the extent of support provided by the system to the user

-    Illustration of many relevant classes, attributes, operations and relationships in a nearly completed class diagram, which represents and matches with most of the system requirements

-    depict fairly well-structured message flows targeted to suitable objects/classes with proper parameters

-    depict fairly well-structured DFD with most data flows correctly shown among context diagram and different levels of DFD

-    Name poorly many use cases and many relationships on use case diagrams

-    Tabulate unclear but acceptable use case descriptions showing partial extent of support provided by the system to the user

-    Illustration of some important classes, attributes, operations and relationships in an uncompleted class diagram, which shows some differences from system requirements

-    depict poorly-structured message flows sometimes  targeted to wrong objects/classes

-    some DFD diagrams among different levels, including the context diagram, are found inconsistency and incorrect in data flows

-    Fail to name many use cases and relationships on use case diagrams

-    Fail to tabulate use case descriptions  showing very little support by the system to the user

-    Fail to illustrate many important classes, attributes, operations and relationships in class diagram, which missed out significant system requirements

-    depict poorly-structured message flows often targeted to wrong objects/classes

-    exhibit usage of simple types of control structures and message flows

-    Fail to have a consistent and accurate data flows among the context diagram and different levels of DFD

[CILO 3] Analyse different options and recommend the best suitable eBS solution

M

-    Effectively distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select suitable ones

-    Distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select reasonable ones

-    Distinguish between available options in modelling requirements and select some suitable ones

-    Fails to distinguish between available options in modelling requirements

[CILO 4] Design and evaluate alternative design strategies for eBS construction.

M

-    Propose several feasible and effective design strategies to the business problem and recommend the most suitable solution.

-    Propose several design strategies to the business problem and recommend a reasonable solution.

-    Propose some simple design strategies to the business problem and recommend an acceptable solution.

-    Fail to propose any design strategy to the business problem and recommend a bad solution

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